From Teacher Burnout to Teacher Wellness

Teacher burnout is epidemic. One in five teachers quit in their first five years of teaching – what happens to the rest? Many live with stress. According to statistics 60% of staff indemnity plan costs and 43% of claims in rehabilitation programs are linked to psychological/psychiatric disorders.  Is dedicated teaching supposed to be rewarded with burnout?

Do you want to teach without the stress that makes so many dedicated teachers want to quit?

You’ve come to the right place. Teaching Wellbeing believes that successful, happy, supported and less-stressed teachers is what drives student success. The best, most dedicated teachers are usually the first to burn out – and those are just the teachers our schools and students need.

You are smart, dedicated, passionate, and competent. How can you be so stressed out if what you’re doing is just what good teachers are supposed to do?

The problem is that our teaching culture normalizes stress. Burnout becomes just another step on the career path. The same habits and tendencies of a workaholic that would have any counselor or life coach concerned for your wellbeing, are exactly the habits and patterns that would get you nominated for the teacher-of-the-year award! No wonder that teachers often don’t express that they are stressed, even if they look, act and feel it.

You are feeling all that negative stress as a result of what you think you are supposed to be doing, so it becomes a matter of “this is just what good teaching feels like” rather than “this feels like anxiety, stress and overwhelm and is detrimental to my wellbeing”.

Teaching is demanding and it can easily swallow up much of your personal time leaving you feeling swamped, anxious, resentful, even depressed – and everyone tells you that’s completely normal.

Here is the truth: It’s not ‘completely normal’, and it is not what teaching is supposed to feel like. There is another way.